Louisiana Coast Blog

Located right at the very center of the Gulf Coast along the Louisiana coastline, St. Mary Parish is true Cajun country. It was back in the 1800s when the early French settlers were attracted to the rich fertile soil to plant and harvest sugar cane. However, this deep bayou country has also served well at providing the community with a rich source of fresh seafood sourced to all the local restaurants. Additionally, with easy accessibility to the deep waters in the Gulf of Mexico, much fresh shellfish and deep-water fish are also available.

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Whether in from out-of-town, or looking to enjoy a local dining experience for the whole family, Jefferson Parish offers a variety of options. Many of these restaurants are ideal for the budget conscious individual, or those looking for family-friendly setting.

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Lafourche Parish Offers a Southern Louisiana Cuisine Experience

Lafourche Parish is situated just a few miles south of Baton Rouge and New Orleans. The parish offers a true Cajun dining experience rich in jambalaya, gumbo, red beans and rice, po’boy sandwiches, crawfish étouffée and pecan pie, along with red beans and rice. Recognized for its traditional Southern cuisine, the parish offers a variety of authentic restaurants at every level of eating, from casual to fine dining.

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While many travelers often consider stopping in New Orleans or Baton Rouge to enjoy some of the more famous dining establishments in the state, Louisiana’s western coast offers its own diversity, traditions, spices, and white linen tablecloths dining establishments too. Aside from the numerous roadside eateries, there are many unrivaled eating establishments in Lake Charles that provide all the gastronomic satisfaction a food enthusiast is searching for.

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The Cajun individuals living in Plaquemines Parish are descendants of some of the first settlers from foreign lands to make their way to American soil. These were the French Acadians that settled in an area recognized as New France back in the 1500s. These individuals laid claim to a huge wilderness as far west as the Rocky Mountains, up to the Hudson Bay, and into Florida. It was their unique culture and style of dining that is now referred to as Cajun cuisine.

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When the primary language of 25 percent of the population in the parish is Cajun French, you know you can’t be too far away from good cooking. Vermilion Parish is situated in some of the richest marshlands that overflow from the Gulf of Mexico, making access to abundant fresh seafood only an arm’s length away.

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When it comes to fine dining eating establishments that offer local Cajun and Creole fare, Iberia Parish is hot. With fields that grow hot chilies for Tabasco on Avery Island, the towns of New Iberia, Jefferson Island, Delcambre, Jeanerette and Loreauville call Iberia Parish home.

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If you wanted to visit the southernmost part of Louisiana, Terrebonne Parish is it. As Louisiana’s second-largest parish, it was first established by early French settlers that gave the parish its name of Terrebonne (Good Earth) nearly 200 years ago.

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There are many fine eating establishments just to the east of the New Orleans area in St. Bernard Parish. Many people that live or visit Louisiana understand that there is something quite unique about the delectable native cuisine offered throughout our southern coastline.

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From Slidell to Covington, and all across St. Tammany Parish, there are many fine eating establishments enjoyed by the local residents and out-of-town guests.

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