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Birding

Birding on Louisiana's CoastLocated on the majestic Mississippi Flyway, the Louisiana Coast is home to some of the most awe-inspiring birds in the country. Over 400 different species of birds visit Louisiana each year making it one of the nation’s top destinations for bird enthusiasts. With birding trails across the Louisiana coastline, there are plenty of opportunities to view the abundant wildlife throughout the Louisiana coastal region. Experience why the productive natural environment of the Great Gulf Coast offers ready access to some of the best birding in the country.

Click here to read more about Louisiana bird watching opportunities.

Click here to download a list of birds you can expect to check off your list!
LA
United States
Louisiana US
Jefferson Parish
LA
United States
Louisiana US
Calcasieu/Cameron Parish
LA
United States
Louisiana US
Terrebonne Parish
LA
United States
Louisiana US
Vermilion Parish
LA
United States
Louisiana US
Vermilion Parish

Centrally located.

900 Dr. Martin Luther King Blvd
70380 Morgan City , LA
United States
Phone: 985-380-8224
Louisiana US
St. Mary/Cajun Coast Parish

The western containment levee of the Atchafalaya Basin at “Charenton Beach” offers an authentically rustic view into this massive swamp, the largest river swamp in North America. The boat launch is definitely utilitarian – a “working man’s boat launch” – and is used primarily by local fishermen. Just north of the boat launch, the water becomes very shallow as it runs eastward into the swamp proper, proving attractive to Spotted Sandpiper, Black-necked Stilt, and other shorebirds. Be sure to scan the horizons for large wading birds such as Anhinga and Great Egret, as well as Osprey, Bald Eagle, and other raptors (especially during the late fall, winter, and early spring months). The black willow-dominated woodland located just outside of the levee is often teaming with songbirds such as Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, White-eyed Vireo, Carolina Wren, Eastern Towhee, Swamp Sparrow (winter) and White-throated Sparrow (winter)

Charenton Beach Road
70523 Charenton , LA
United States
Phone: 800-256-2931
Louisiana US
St. Mary/Cajun Coast Parish

The Atchafalaya Delta Wildlife Management Area is a 137,695-acre area located at the mouths of the Atchafalaya River and the Wax Lake Outlet in St. Mary Parish. The area is located some 25 miles south of the towns of Morgan City and Calumet and is accessible only by boat. Most of the area consists of open water in Atchafalaya Bay. Within the Bay, two deltas (the Main Delta and the Wax Lake Delta) have formed from the accretion of sediments from the Atchafalaya River and from the deposition of dredged material by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Only about 27,000 acres are vegetated on these deltas. About 15,000 acres of marsh and scrubby habitat occur on the Main Delta, and about 12,000 acres of marsh occur on the Wax Lake Delta. Hunting on the Delta is primarily for waterfowl, deer, and rabbit. Deer hunting on the Main Delta (deer hunting on the Wax Lake Delta is not permitted) is restricted to archery hunting by adults and youth lottery gun hunts. Harvest per unit effort on deer is extremely high. Fur trapping, commercial fishing, recreational fishing (especially for redfish, catfish, bass, and bluegill) and alligator harvests also yield great returns. Non-consumptive recreational pursuits include boating, camping, and bird-watching, especially on the Main Delta. The area has two campground areas (with primitive restrooms) and has a number of pilings available for houseboat mooring. Overnight mooring is allowed via permit only (16-day permits or hunting season permits). Year-round mooring is prohibited. LDWF offers both lease and lottery opportunities. 

United States
Phone: 337-373-0032
US
St. Mary/Cajun Coast Parish

Attakapas Wildlife Management Area, located in upper St. Mary Parish and in parts of lower St. Martin and Iberia Parishes, was acquired in 1976. The center of the area is situated about 20 miles NW of Morgan City and 10 miles NE of Franklin. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns a small tract of land that is also managed by La. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Access to the 27,962 acre tract is by boat only, with major public launches available: (1) Millet Point, at St. Mary Parish Road 123, off of Hwy 87, (2) NNE of Charenton Of Hwy 326, (3) above Morgan City on Hwy 70, (4) off Hwy. 75 at Bayou Pigeon landing in Iberville Parish.

The terrain is characterized by flat swampland subject to periodic flooding and siltation from the Atchafalaya River. Areas adjacent to the River and spoil banks from dredging activities provide upland habitat and refuge areas during periods of high water. Many pockets in the management area have silted in and will continue to increase the land-to-water ratio.

The main overhead vegetation in the swamp is cypress and tupelo with some oak, maple and hackberry growing in the upland areas. Black willow is prevalent on the newly deposited lands, which are prevalent throughout the management area. Understory vegetation in upland tracts includes blackberry, deciduous holly, elderbery, and goldenrod. Greenbriars, peppervine, pokeweed, palmetto and switch cane. Common swamp plants are lizard tail, alligator weed, smartweed, coontail, pennywort and water hyacinth. In 1992, Hurricane Andrew caused wide scale destruction to the trees on Attakapas. The Department reforested many of the higher areas along the Atchafalaya River with cypress, ash, elm, water oak, nuttall oak, cherrybark oak, cow oak and other upland species. Also, roughly 30 miles of trails have been created and maintained around these reforested plots on the east and west sides of the Atchafalaya River.

Game animals most hunted on the management area are deer, rabbits and squirrels. Waterfowl hunting is also popular. Other animals present are beaver, nutria, otter, mink, muskrat, raccoon, bobcat, opossum, and alligator. Trapping is allowed for furbearing animals. Hawks, owls, shorebirds, and neo-tropical migrants are also present.

Crawfish, found throughout the spillway, provide commercial and recreational opportunities. Major fish caught in the area include catfish, mullet, bass, bluegill, gar, bowfin, and freshwater drum.

The self-clearing permit is required for hunters only. There are three primitive, remote camping areas on Attakapas. There is one camping area with picnic tables and running water located on St. Mary Parish Road 123 near Millet Point. Additional information may be obtained may be obtained from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, 5652 Hwy 182, Opelousas, Louisiana 70570.

NW of Morgan City
70380 Morgan City , LA
United States
Phone: 337-948-0255
Louisiana US
St. Mary/Cajun Coast Parish
Barataria Preserve - Bayou Coquille
6588 Barataria Boulevard
Marrero , LA
United States
Louisiana US
Jefferson Parish

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